One Patient's Positive Perspectives

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Benlysta Infusions Started August 2011

Every four weeks, month after month for almost four years now, three to four hours of each month has been devoted to an infusion chair.  Doing a little mathematics reveals that a little shy of 200 hours have been invested in Benlysta (belimumab) infusions for lupus.  As medical milestones of each month, they are helping subdue and manage the impacts of lupus.  Before lupus, the threat of quitting work due to early disability retirement loomed ahead, but the powerful work of this relatively new biologic drug reversed that.

With the return of greater ability to enjoy challenging adventures, quality of life is improved.  Intensity of lupus signs and symptoms have dramatically decreased over time, although the benefits were slow to show up in the first few months.  The first few months showed little change in lupus severity, but during the next few months that followed, symptoms decreased, pain lessened, and flares began to be shorter and less frequent.  During the second year of taking Benlysta, overall health and strength gradually improved.  Now, after almost four years, the infusions continue and keep lupus in manageable check.

imagesOVOE762VTwo noteworthy observations about effects of a Benlysta monthly treatment cycle:

  • Signs and symptoms of lupus seem to increase during the week before my infusion.
  • After Friday infusions, extreme, bone-tired fatigue lasts through each weekend.
  • Immune system remained strong, if not better

Benlysta may be a great option for many lupus patients, may be just what their doctor ordered!  As for me, I thank God daily for the help and control of my lupus it continues to give.

insurance-claim-form

Separating the Injury Claims

When a lupus patient has an auto accident, work comp injury, or some other personal injury where an accident insurance claim may be involved, sorting out treatment and claims can get pretty tricky.  Personal experience with these type of insurance claims provided some perspectives about working with doctors to sort out each new injury, and distinguish it from previous injuries and chronic illness.  The most recent auto accident that happened makes dealing with several issues fresh all over again!

Years ago, two different injuries resulted in insurance claims.  First, an auto accident followed a few weeks later by a fall down stairs at work.  Communication was the key to sorting out the differences between injuries.  Now, a recent auto accident was followed by a trip and fall at the shopping mall, and the same approach is needed once again.

Granted, with auto-immune illness, there are always many days with pain and discomfort, but new injuries seem to make coping even more difficult.   Day by day it has taken patience through the recovery, meanwhile remembering to ask God for the grace to be able to refrain from too much grumbling.  This too will pass, and the Bible says that the rain falls on everyone, so the storm becomes a little personal.  The new traumas also caused lupus to flare for several weeks.

Because of ongoing medical problems from chronic disease, communication with a doctor after a traumatic injury is very important.  Providing very complete, specific, and accurate information helped doctors and employers understand new symptoms and distinguish accident-related time off work.  Although several past accident injury claims were unfortunate, a few personal kernels of reality and wisdom emerged from the experiences.  While clearly not legal advice (which would be extremely unethical for this non-lawyer to provide), these personal observations may give some helpful insight to others patients with chronic illness who are facing a similar accidental injury situation.

A doctor will finally understand it is lupus

Communicate Well with Your Doctors

Three foundational, if not simplistic, realizations:

  1. Only medical problems clearly a result of the accident injury were covered by any of the claims.
  2. Unchanged pre-existing medical problems were not part of the injury insurance claims. (Obvious but worth saying)
  3. Flares of of pre-existing medical problems clearly triggered by the injury were able to be included in the claims, but only to the degree this diagnosis was included in medical records statements that supported how the autoimmune illness had worsened after the accidents, and because of the accidents.

Four conversations throughout various stages of recovery that it helped to chat with the doctor about:

  1. Asking what percent the doctor thought recovery from the first accident was reached, right after the second accident happened.  This helped establish a milestone in the treatment that we would work our way back toward during recovery from the second accident.
  2. Asking the doctor about how they thought injuries from the second accident were different than the first.  It helped when the doctor compared and contrasted between both injuries, and this gave clear information to use talking to both insurance companies.
  3. If the doctor doesn’t mention the idea, suggesting the concept to the doctor of a “window” in the recovery from the first accident while the second accident recovery was in progress.  This helped work with both insurance companies to make clear agreement about who was paying for what and when.  This helped the first insurance company know what to expect, and to realize they would be resuming responsibility for medical treatment costs after the recovery milestone was reached.
  4. Asking about total recovery in percentages after resuming the treatment just for the remaining first accident injuries, helped keep things straight with the insurance company.  Ongoing conversation about status of recovery with the doctor and claims adjuster helped keep everyone’s expectations and timelines clear.
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June 14th is Flag Day – Happy Birthday, Sis!

After having a couple of previous injuries, three serious car accidents, a work comp fall down stairs on the job, and two slip and fall injuries, personal experiences helped clarify the impact of an accident injury on overall lupus condition and general health.  It seems that if both adjusters and doctors had not been part of the conversations during recovery, proving diagnosis of increased lupus activity due to the traumatic injury would have been much harder.  It seemed better for everyone to be involved in ongoing discussion about the degree pre-accident health had be reached.

Of course, with lupus or any autoimmune disease, there is no “back to normal”, but with good communication, it can become clear when near “normal” health was regained.  Each day, no matter what it brings, is a glorious new day to be alive, what ever “normal” ends up being.

Know Lupus Game My Score 100 PercentPlay the Know Lupus game online… and earn donations for answering awareness questions.

Try to get through both levels with 100%  It was fun, so check it out and spread the word to others to check out this fund lupus awareness activity at the Lupus Foundation of America site.

Play:  The Lupus Game and see if you can beat the challenge!

 

WP_20141129_15_16_32_Pro (1)Infusion day seemed a fitting event for experiencing Lupus Awareness Month with flare.  With the day spent in a circular junket around town, my little PT cruised from doctor to doctor for treatment for lingering problems from a recent car accident, and then to an annual Plaquenil eye check up.  With two hours to spare, I stopped in for manicure and a pedicure, and had an interesting discovery.Hair curls, manicures, pedicures but no lupus cures...

When the nail tech removed the bright purple nail polish, she noticed that the big toe nail had separated from the nail bed, but without any apparent reason such as fungus or infection.  It appears my big toe nail completely died, and the nail stopped growing several weeks ago.

The salon suggested that trauma during my late March trip and fall at the shopping mall killed the nail.  Perhaps while scuffing knees and straining the ankle, the nail bed base also sustained a hefty wallop on the edge of the cement step or the sidewalk.  The nail salon urged me to show my toe nail to the nurse while at the rheumatologist’s office for my monthly Benlysta infusion.

The verdict,  “Expect to lose the toe nail soon.”  Well, it seems the summer  fashion forecast lacks any nail vanity, and just in time for sandal season.  It will be interesting looking for closed toed summer shoes for a niece’s late July wedding.  What fun!

The infusion was the last planned stop of the full “medical” day.

infusion in handThe afternoon passed in the infusion chair with a monstrous accounting textbook perched on my lap and a fresh yellow highlighter gliding across the pages.

Eventually it was hard to pay attention to studying for my college class.  The friendly chatter of a couple of other patients getting RA infusions was more engaging than dwelling on the accounting formula, “Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity”.  Without asking, it was clear they obviously didn’t want to chat about accounting!

No one does.  The reason is hard to pin down, but no one else seems to get very enthused about chatting about or otherwise dwelling on accounting theory, either!

thDDSVWJG3After all the fun traveling from Arizona to Philadelphia for the 2015 GSK Lupus Blogger Summit, life and reality always have their return.  The high point was stepping off the plane 10 minutes earlier than expected and calling on the cell phone to find out my husband was already almost at the airport.  It is so nice when you have those moments that remind you that the one you miss, misses you, too!  After leaving the east coast at noon it was eight when a suitcase and tired girl slipped into the pickup truck.

Hungry and tired, we stopped off at a coffee shop for comfort food, pie and a coke, did some catching up.  A friend was working last night, and waited on our table, and with the sodas, placed a fresh red carnation table in front of me with the gentle explanation, “a flower for you.”  That was sweet and a welcoming thought after a long, flight weary day.  Tummies full and spirits a little revived, we were thankful to be together and soon ready for the last five-minute trip home.

Exhaustion overtook both of us, and after a quick shower blasted away the grime of taxicabs, airports, and airplanes, sleep arrived almost instantaneously.  The night passed nearly as quickly, ending abruptly with the welcome smell of fresh coffee on the bed table beside me.  Leaning on the pile of pillows he tossed my direction from the nearby bench, eyelids drooped off to moments of sleep and husband’s chatter between sips from a warm caffeine-filled mug.

th2C28Z9N0Unlike the night, morning moved very, very slowly, matched only by slow reflexes and even slower murky disconnected thoughts.  If ever there was a day to be tempted to call in sick with my lupus after a trip, this was it.  Unlike the sweltering sauna on the east coast, the Arizona desert morning was unexpectedly crisp and refreshing.  After kissing my husband goodbye in the driveway, the second cup of coffee led me through the house into the back yard’s fresh air and fragrant rose blossoms.

Delightfully, the cool morning breeze invigorated and refreshed, as deep draughts of blustery breeze wakened a sleepy set of lungs, slapping fresh life into the lupus fogged gal walking around the yard in my slippers!  The day began to look suddenly promising and worthy of pursuit.  The refrain actually passed over astonished lips, “Oh, what a beautiful morning!”  What a blessing to be home in my back yard!

Quickly gathering all the loose ends of hair, clothing, keys and a sack lunch, every thing seemed to tumble to the floor as a startling reminder CNS lupus might be a little flared from exertion and travel.  The reality of lupus limitations has a sneaky way of keeping a gal humble.

The commute drive was executed with extra care and attention, followed by a couple of conversations at work with obvious moments of difficult enunciation.  Mild lingering CNS difficulty lasted through mid afternoon, but finally the fog burned away completely.  Eventually, the morning song continued into later afternoon with, “Oh, what a beautiful day!”

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Breakfast of Lupus Champions @TiffanyAndLupus @LAlupuslady @LeslieRott and @LupusAdventurer (taking pix)

Sharing stories and coffee we nibble and smile,
while catching a quick bite to eat.
All kindred spirits fighting for health,
if only our foe to defeat!

We strive and endeavor to get the word out
and tell anyone who will hear
Awareness of facts each person should know,
information to replace their fear.

WP_20150512_001Each of us bloggers and advocates strong,
we gather with purpose as one,
We’ll talk and discuss issues we know so well,
informally we’ve already begun.

A few minutes later we join all the rest,
in the summit we’ve come to create,
With meeting of minds, a free flow of thoughts,
and messages we each came to state.

For just a few hours, we gathered together,
a great combination of voices we were,
Relationships strengthened in this rare adventure.
If only there could be a cure!

Short of that miracle, so much can be done
through research and tireless care,
Joining perspectives and wisdom diverse
by patient advocates with personal flare!

Our voice will be different, more united and strong,
after meeting together today,
What once was just virtual has leapt into life,
after meeting in this wonderful way.

Encouraged and enthused, still striving on
to reach out to every life we can touch,
Advocating, writing, and partnering together.
Alone, we could never do as much!

Lupus Adventurer
© May 2015


Edited in Lumia Selfie

Lupus Adventurer and Sarah Gorman at GSK Lupus Summit

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Leslie Rott @LeslieRott

#GSKsummit Lupus Summit

#GSKsummit on Lupus @shanelleG @LeslieRott @LAlupuslady @LupusAdventurer @cmswrites @TiffanyAndLupus @marlajan @despitelupus

A very special thank you goes out to Glasko Smith Kline for sponsoring the May 12, 2015 GSK Summit on Lupus — #GSKsummit , and inviting  lupus bloggers to join in this precedent-setting lupus event. Note to Reader: GSK provided reimbursement for travel and expenses to attend the GSK Lupus Summit.  However, this post is voluntary, represents my own views and I was not paid to write it, nor asked to promote GSK or its medicines.

Edited in Lumia Selfie

Charlotte, NC Airport

All day was spent traveling from Arizona to Philadelphia… three airports, two flights and a taxi ride.  Sitting here in the hotel room, the view includes the GSK Corporate offices next door, and the 76er’s and Eagles’ sports complex.  This is a great time to kick up heels and unwind before looking for some dinner.

Taken with Lumia Selfie

Boarding for Philly

GSK had a welcome packet waiting at hotel front desk, in preparation for tomorrow’s GSK 2015 Lupus Summit — #GSKsummit — and it seems the other bloggers have not yet arrived.  It will be great to meet some of the other participants who have been social media “pen pals”.

The updated list of participants in the welcome packets includes lupus bloggers with these Twitter addresses: @marlajan, @ShanelleG @despitelupus, @LAlupuslady, @lupusguru, @TiffanyAndLupus, @cmswrites, @LupusChickcom, @LeslieRott, @QueenofSpain, and of course, “moi”, @LupusAdventurer.

Looking forward to tomorrow’s adventure.  Follow us tomorrow on Twitter.

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